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Technology Partnerships
 

Contact Information

Mathew Willenbrink

Director for Technology Partnerships

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1700 SPB Suite M5200

300 College Park

Dayton, OH 45469-0102

 

937-229-3469
937-229-3873 (fax)




Also see our Technologies Available for Licensing.

 

The University of Dayton became involved in technology transfer in 1975 through its involvement in patenting and licensing a process that uses the controlled decomposition of a fluorocarbon resin to clean and remove protective coatings from metal parts. The University’s involvement in technology commercialization increased as a result of the government requirements to find more ways to transfer technology to the private sector, especially after passage of the Bayh-Dole Act in 1980.  

 

In 1984, the University established a formal technology transfer activity located in the Research Institute. The Technology Partnerships office provides service and support to University researchers in securing industrial sponsorship for research projects, develops appropriate research agreements with industry to protect the University’s intellectual property rights, deals with intellectual property issues in government and industrial contracts, and commercially develops inventions to generate royalty income from licenses to support the technology commercialization program and the University research programs. Mathew Willenbrink, Director for Technology Partnerships, works with inventors to obtain patents on university inventions and licenses University technology to outside companies.

 

Over the years, the technology commercialization program has been successful in developing and commercializing inventions such as phase change materials, the RULER and COAT (smart dipstick) technology, Autodamp/Autobeam software, material analysis and testing software (MATE), and advanced polymer materials.

 

In 1996, the University updated its policy on patents and copyrights and approved the Intellectual Property Policy and Procedures document. The new document treats in more detail all matters related to intellectual property. The document also explains the significant changes that were made to the manner in which income from the commercialization of University technology is distributed. The new royalty-sharing policy is much more attractive to the inventor, and for the first time, the inventor’s division or department receives a share of the net income.


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